Courses

Title Instructor Credit
Historiography: Themes in Its History and Approaches to Its Theory

The course will provide an overview of major issues and approaches in historiography from classical antiquity to present times. Its broad span is not motivated only by the intention to offer descriptions of essential schools of thought; the course will provide introductory classes to different issues and problem areas related to history writing together with the analysis of their inquiries, questions and concepts..

Daniel Ziemann
Istvan Rev
Ioana Macrea-Toma
2.0
Academic Latin: An Introduction to Research Methodology

This course is meant to equip all students enrolled at the Medieval Studies Department with a basic knowledge of Latin as a "technical language" still used today in academic environments.

Cristian-Nicolae Gaşpar 2.0
Academic Latin: An Introduction to Research Methodology

This course is meant to equip all students enrolled at the Medieval Studies Department with a basic knowledge of Latin as a "technical language" still used today in academic environments.

Cristian-Nicolae Gaşpar 2.0
Academic Writing

The aim of this course is to help you develop as a writer within the English speaking academic community by raising awareness of, practicing, and reflecting upon the conventions of written texts. In addition to addressing issues related to academic writing, the course will also focus on the other skills you will need to complete your graduate level work in English.

During the course, you will:

2.0
Academic Writing

The aim of this course is to help you develop as a writer within the English speaking academic community by raising awareness of, practicing, and reflecting upon the conventions of written texts. In addition to addressing issues related to academic writing, the course will also focus on the other skills you will need to complete your graduate level work in English.

During the course, you will:

2.0
Advanced Research Methodology

This is a required course for probationary doctoral candidates intended to foster academic research methods and writing skills that will enable incoming PhD students to participate fully in scholarly life and discourse as professionals. It is designed as a venue for each student to develop a strong dissertation prospectus that includes a clear statement of dissertation topics, research questions, a well-thought-out description of methodology, a consideration of potential primary and secondary sources, and a carefully prepared bibliography.

2.0
Advanced Research Methodology

This is a required course for probationary doctoral candidates intended to foster academic research methods and writing skills that will enable incoming PhD students to participate fully in scholarly life and discourse as professionals. It is designed as a venue for each student to develop a strong dissertation prospectus that includes a clear statement of dissertation topics, research questions, a well-thought-out description of methodology, a consideration of potential primary and secondary sources, and a carefully prepared bibliography.

2.0
Archives, Libraries, Museums from Antiquity to the Digital Age: Institutional History of Cultural Heritage Katalin Szende
Marcell Sebők
2.0
CC and CC tutorial - Spiritual and secular power in the Middle Ages – From Gelasius to the Reformation

The participants are expected to contribute to the discussions by making themselves familiar with the topics and the proposed readings. Each session will be specially prepared by one of the participants who will act as a kind of moderator. At the end of the course, a short paper between 8 and 10 pages about a topic of the participant's own choice will complete the assessment requirements. The final paper will count for 50% of the final grade while the prepared sessions and the general participation will count for the remaining 50 %.
Full description:

Daniel Ziemann 4.0
CC: Centre and Periphery in the Age of Constantine VII Porphyrogennetos: Approaches to the Tenth-Century Eastern Mediterranean Niels Gaul 4.0
CC: Reading Medieval Material Culture

Recent developments in historical research reflect an increasing interest in the field of material culture. This interest has moved away from dealing with isolated and de-contextualized objects and artefacts used by people in the past which one can often find in studies of the nineteenth and twentieth century. Scholarship now concentrates on relationships, interdependencies, and influences as well as on trans- and interdisciplinary approaches.

Alice Mathea Choyke
Gerhard Jaritz
2.0
Faculty Research Seminar

The Faculty Research Seminar invites the departmental and CEU communities to share, learn about and discuss ongoing research. Presenters – visiting scholars, resident faculty, as well as advanced doctoral students or post-docs – are encouraged to offer work-in-progress (draft book chapters, articles, conference papers) or problematic passages from their sources for discussion, rather than to read refined papers. Topics will cover the whole range of medieval and historical studies at CEU.

Daniel Ziemann 1.0
GIS in Cultural Heritage Studies

Using Geographical Information Systems (GIS) has become a popular approach in many research disciplines which traditionally have not widely utilized computer based technologies. As one of such disciplines Cultural Heritage Studies actively explores high application potential of GIS methodology and tools. Until lately maps development and geospatial analysis was a prerogative of cartographers and, later, experts in specialized computer software (early GIS packages).

Viktor Lagutov 2.0
Historical Anthropology and the Cultural Turn

The seminar revisits the theoretical questions emerging in the combination of historical and anthropological research since the 1960s. Starting from the acquaintance with some influential anthropological works – that of Turner, Geertz, Sahlins, Evans-Pritchard, and others –, much in use by historians, we will reconsider the possible analytical frames and revisit principal themes of medieval and early modern history where anthropological methods yielded considerable results.

Gábor Klaniczay
Marcell Sebők
2.0
Historical Anthropology and the Cultural Turn Gábor Klaniczay
Marcell Sebők
2.0
Independent Study

For medieval students only; students read important works in their area of interest in consultation with their advisors. The amount of reading will vary with the number of credits students enroll for.  PhD students with expertise close to the MA student’s thesis topic can be involved in selecting and discussing the readings.

2.0
Introduction to Cultural Heritage Management. Project Management

The main aim of the course is to introduce the basic elements of cultural heritage management in the form of project management. The course is designed by the concept of “learning by doing”: students are expected to take part in three heritage projects developed by the instructors. This means active participation in all phases of project management (development of concepts, planning, scheduling, initiating, executing). Standard elements of project management (issues, milestones, stakeholders, strategies, project outcome, etc.) will be in the focus of individual meetings. 

József Laszlovszky
Zsuzsanna Szálka
2.0
Introduction to Interdisciplinary Medieval Studies

The course aims to provide students with an overview of recent historiographical and methodological discussions around "Medieval Studies". The class will not follow a chronological path (and overview) but attempts to trace historiographical trends as well introduce a variety of disciplines (archaeology, numismatics, theology etc.) necessary to study and understand the "Middle Ages". However, the sessions on these disciplines will also have a thematic focus in order to demonstrate the interplay between various disciplines and their use for scholars and students in their research.

Volker Menze
József Laszlovszky
2.0
Introduction to Research Resources for Cultural Heritage Studies and the Cultural Heritage of Budapest

The course intends to introduce new students in cultural heritage studies to the research resources offered by CEU in general, with a view of other heritage institutions (museums, monument protection institutions, archives, libraries) in Budapest. It incorporates presentations and guided tours offered by faculty members and experts working in the different heritage related institutions.

József Laszlovszky
Balázs Nagy
2.0
Introduction to Research Resources for Medievalists

The course intends to introduce new medievalist students to the research resources offered by CEU in general and the Department of Medieval Studies in particular, with visits to libraries and museums in Budapest. It also gives an overview of the research facilities and main academic journals available for the students of our department.

Balázs Nagy 2.0
Issues in Cultural Heritage

The course is organized around ideas, issues, and cultural practices used to address questions of cultural heritage. Students will develop their views on what constitutes cultural heritage and how it fits into cultural, historical, political, environmental, economic, and other social structures. Students are meant to build a comparative picture based on the multidisciplinary ideas and concepts involved: Value, protection, costs and benefits, stakeholders, managers, ethics, and so on. This class is an opportunity for each student to define and focus his/her own cultural heritage persona.

Judith Rasson 2.0
Judaism and Christianity

The relations between Christians and Jews, which will be explored in this class in a comprehensive and interdisciplinary perspective, present one of the most enduring cases of a cultural "pair" in the Mediterranean and European contexts: both communities refer to common sacred texts, historical narratives, and religious values, but their self-definition necessarily includes a distinction from the other.

Carsten L. Wilke 2.0
Late Antique & Byzantine Studies: Research Methodologies & Research Trends Volker Menze
Niels Gaul
2.0
Latin Palaeography, Book hand

The aim of the course is to provide tuition in the practical skill of Latin palaeography (book hand). The course focuses on the reading and transcription of various scripts with samples ranging from the 4th to the 15th centuries, covering the whole medieval period. Each class consists of sight reading (reading without preparation) of photocopied manuscript folios written in different scripts, discussion of the characteristics of the hand, script and abbreviations and a brief introduction to the relevant script through powerpoint presentation and white board illustration.

Anna Somfai 2.0
Latin Palaeography, Book hand

The aim of the course is to provide tuition in the practical skill of Latin palaeography (book hand). The course focuses on the reading and transcription of various scripts with samples ranging from the 4th to the 15th centuries, covering the whole medieval period. Each class consists of sight reading (reading without preparation) of photocopied manuscript folios written in different scripts, discussion of the characteristics of the hand, script and abbreviations and a brief introduction to the relevant script through powerpoint presentation and white board illustration.

Anna Somfai 2.0
MA Thesis Seminar Mike Griffin 2.0
MA Thesis Seminar Mike Griffin 2.0
MA Thesis Seminar I

This course is mandatory for all 1-Year MA students and second year 2-Year MA students in the medieval track. This course will have two sections in the Fall Term: one for the 1-year MA group and one for the 2-year MA group. After a common introductory meeting in the pre-session, the two sections will meet separately.

Katalin Szende
Tijana Krstić
0.0
Medieval Architecture

Gothic cathedrals, Romanesque monasteries, knightly castles: medieval architecture is one of the most appealing part of art history. However, its language is the most complex and the most difficult for amateurs. Therefore this course offers an introduction into the English terminology of architectural description with a handout of the most useful terms. We will practice the reading of architectural drawings and photographs. Technical observations of irregular details will lead us to differentiate the building periods.

Béla Zsolt Szakács 2.0
Medieval Codicology

The aim of the course is to provide familiarity with the medieval manuscript book, the object that transmitted classical and medieval texts and images and now enables us to arrive at a knowledge concerning the environment, interests and scholarship of those who produced and used each codex.

Anna Somfai 2.0
Medieval Latin Text Seminar: Reading and Interpreting Virgil in Late Antiquity

The Medieval Latin Text Seminar is offered primarily to all PhD students (but is also open to interested MA students), whose level is above Intermediate, i.e., who have taken at least four semesters of Latin at CEU or the equivalent elsewhere, and who would like to improve their skills in reading and interpreting Late and Medieval Latin. Participants in the class should have a solid grasp of Latin morphology and adequate knowledge of Latin syntax.

Cristian-Nicolae Gaşpar 2.0
Medieval Latin Text Seminar: Reading and Interpreting Virgil in Late Antiquity

The Medieval Latin Text Seminar is offered primarily to all PhD students (but is also open to interested MA students), whose level is above Intermediate, i.e., who have taken at least four semesters of Latin at CEU or the equivalent elsewhere, and who would like to improve their skills in reading and interpreting Late and Medieval Latin. Participants in the class should have a solid grasp of Latin morphology and adequate knowledge of Latin syntax.

Cristian-Nicolae Gaşpar 2.0
Nature, People and Society in the Middle Ages

Environmental historical research began in the 1970s with the aim of interpreting human history through the lens of both historical and ecological processes. The primary goal is studying the relationship between the physical and biological environments in past human societies. The two instructors for the course have very different, but complementary specializations comprising different kinds of data and paradigms: Alice Choyke (bio-archaeology and archaeozoology) and András Vadas (climate and environmental history).

Alice Mathea Choyke 2.0
Nature, People, and Society in the Middle Ages Alice Mathea Choyke
András Vadas
2.0
Pagan-Christian Philosophical Debates in Late Antiquity: The Nature of the Divine and the Nature of the World István Perczel 2.0
Presenting Cultural Heritage

Cultural heritage practitioners must be able to communicate with different audiences in different settings. The goal of this course is for students to learn and practice oral, written, and visual communication skills. The course is a companion to the more theoretical courses on the social, political, and environmental context of cultural heritage management practices. 

Judith Rasson
Zsuzsa Reed
2.0
Presenting Cultural Heritage

Cultural heritage practitioners must be able to communicate with different audiences in different settings. The goal of this course is for students to learn and practice oral, written, and visual communication skills. The course is a companion to the more theoretical courses on the social, political, and environmental context of cultural heritage management practices.

Judith Rasson 2.0
Reformation, Tolerance, Heterododxy in Early Modern Europe

The early modern period is surely not remembered as a century of tolerance. One could recall the religious conflicts in Germany, the massacre on Saint Bartholomew's day in France, the refugees from the Low Countries, or the operations of the Inquisition in Italy, Spain and Portugal, not to mention the witch-hunts in many parts of Europe and the religious aspects of the Thirty Years War. During the so-called Reformation times, however, the question of tolerance became a central issue for the first time in public discourse.

Gyorgy E. Szonyi 2.0
Religion and Society in Late Antiquity (4th-9th centuries)

Taking Late Antiquity in a very large sense as a period stretching from the fourth to the ninth century, this multidisciplinary course focuses on the transformation of religion and  society and the interpretations of these processes in historiography. Change in belief or ritual is usually understood as a result or reflection of profound social and spiritual upheavals. Was it religion that changed society or society that changed its religion?

Marianne Sághy 2.0
Religious Experience and the Metaphysics of the Sacred Philip Goff 2.0
Sufism in the Age of Empires (14th-18th centuries): New Approaches to the Study of “Islamic Mysticism” in the Late Medieval and Early Modern Eras Tijana Krstić
The Bible for Medievalists

The Bible played a fundamental role in a varied way in the formation of the intellectual (and also material) culture of the Middle Ages. The “language and the logic of the Bible” shaped (in different degrees) the form of the church as an institution, her legal system, the liturgy, the sermons, iconography, theology, and ultimately profane literature, too.

György Geréby 2.0
Topics in Medieval Philosophy György Geréby
TS: Empires

Empires have been a prominent feature of world history: from the Assyrians to the Persians (Achaemenid), Athenians, Romans, Sasanians, and Chinese via the Byzantines, Umayyads, Abbasids and Mongols (not to mention the as yet ‘undiscovered’ empires of the Americas) to the Ottoman, Mughal, Spanish, Dutch, and British; to the Austrian, Prussian and Russian empires. The current situation of the United States, the Russian Federation, China, or, indeed, the European Union serves as an ample reminder that our own times might be less of an age of nation-states than it might appear at first glance.

Niels Gaul
Tolga U. Esmer
2.0