Courses

Title Instructor Credit
Academic Writing

Aims of the Course

The aim of this course is to help you develop as a writer within the English speaking academic community by raising awareness of, practicing, and reflecting upon the conventions of written texts. In addition to addressing issues related to academic writing, the course will also focus on the other skills you will need to complete your graduate level work in English.

During the course, you will:

Thomas Rooney 2.0
Advanced Latin

Careful reading of a Latin text, paying particular attention to syntax and vocabulary, with the aim of increasing reading fluency. A possible text is Augustine, De Civitate Dei, depending on need and interest. Interested students are encouraged to get in touch with Gina (gwhite@princeton.edu) with any requests or suggestions

Gina White 2.0
Advanced Latin

Careful reading of a Latin text, paying particular attention to syntax and vocabulary, with the aim of increasing reading fluency. A possible text is Augustine, De Civitate Dei, depending on need and interest. Interested students are encouraged to get in touch with Gina (gwhite@princeton.edu) with any requests or suggestions

Gina White 2.0
Advanced Research Methodology

This is a required course for probationary doctoral candidates intended to foster academic research methods and writing skills that will enable incoming PhD students to participate fully in scholarly life and discourse as professionals. It is designed as a venue for each student to develop a strong dissertation prospectus that includes a clear statement of dissertation topics, research questions, a well-thought-out description of methodology, a consideration of potential primary and secondary sources, and a carefully prepared bibliography.

2.0
Bible for Medievalists

Introduction to the Late Antique and Medieval textual history and interpretations of the Bible (LXX and Vulgate) and the apocrypha. Students will grasp the main ideas of medieval biblical thought, like history of salvation, rulership ideology, spirituality and iconography.

György Geréby 2.0
Bible for Medievalists

Introduction to the Late Antique and Medieval textual history and interpretations of the Bible (LXX and Vulgate) and the apocrypha. Students will grasp the main ideas of medieval biblical thought, like history of salvation, rulership ideology, spirituality and iconography.

György Geréby 2.0
Byzantine and Eastern Christian Narrative Sources

The course will be similar to this year’s course but broader, including many more topics. In fact, it has become clear that the time frame is too short for such a type of course. Those who drop the course after the first term will be introduced only to the earlier material, those who join it only in the second term will be introduced to the later material only.

István Perczel 2.0
Byzantine and Eastern Christian Narrative Sources

The course will be similar to this year’s course but broader, including many more topics. In fact, it has become clear that the time frame is too short for such a type of course. Those who drop the course after the first term will be introduced only to the earlier material, those who join it only in the second term will be introduced to the later material only.

István Perczel 2.0
Byzantine Spiritual Theories (Reading Class in Greek)

Close reading of choice texts of Byzantine spirituality (Evagrius of Pontus, Diadochus of Photike, John of the Ladder, Gregory of Sinai).

György Geréby 2.0
Byzantine Spiritual Theories (Reading Class in Greek)

Close reading of choice texts of Byzantine spirituality (Evagrius of Pontus, Diadochus of Photike, John of the Ladder, Gregory of Sinai).

György Geréby 2.0
CC: Art and Liturgy in the Middle Ages

The world of medieval art, albeit very appealing for present-day spectators, is a special microcosm. Most medieval works of art have lost their original context and even those which are in continuous use are subjects of changes from time to time. In order to understand the real significance of medieval art we have to turn to the historical and functional contexts. As the best preserved medieval buildings and works of art usually come from the church context, research into their original liturgical purpose is of primary importance.

Béla Zsolt Szakács 2.0
CC: Art and Liturgy in the Middle Ages

The world of medieval art, albeit very appealing for present-day spectators, is a special microcosm. Most medieval works of art have lost their original context and even those which are in continuous use are subjects of changes from time to time. In order to understand the real significance of medieval art we have to turn to the historical and functional contexts. As the best preserved medieval buildings and works of art usually come from the church context, research into their original liturgical purpose is of primary importance.

Béla Zsolt Szakács 2.0
CC: Central Europe in the High and Later Middle Ages

This course provides an overview of the political and economic history of medieval Central Europe. The instructors are aware that there are plenty of discussions on the perception and definition of medieval Central Europe. However they will concentrate to outline the changes in the countries of Poland, Bohemia and Hungary from the 11th till the 15th century.

Balázs Nagy 2.0
CC: Central Europe in the High and Later Middle Ages

This course provides an overview of the political and economic history of medieval Central Europe. The instructors are aware that there are plenty of discussions on the perception and definition of medieval Central Europe. However they will concentrate to outline the changes in the countries of Poland, Bohemia and Hungary from the 11th till the 15th century.

Balázs Nagy 2.0
CC: History of Daily Life

The class is an introduction into the analysis of daily life in the past. It concentrates on the Middle |Ages and the early modern period, but offers also comparative approaches to earlier and later eras. Special attention is paid to theoretical and methodological aspects of analysis, the usage of various types of sources (written material, images, archaeological evidence), and their critical interpretation. The seminar also deals intensively with the role of social space as well as with gender-related aspects.

Gerhard Jaritz 2.0
CC: History of Daily Life

The class is an introduction into the analysis of daily life in the past. It concentrates on the Middle |Ages and the early modern period, but offers also comparative approaches to earlier and later eras. Special attention is paid to theoretical and methodological aspects of analysis, the usage of various types of sources (written material, images, archaeological evidence), and their critical interpretation. The seminar also deals intensively with the role of social space as well as with gender-related aspects.

Gerhard Jaritz 2.0
CC: The Formation of Political and Ecclesiastical Theory: From Cicero to Erasmus

An overview of some of the most important ideas and concepts in political and ecclesiastical thought from Antiquity until the Reformation

Daniel Ziemann 2.0
CC: The Formation of Political and Ecclesiastical Theory: From Cicero to Erasmus

An overview of some of the most important ideas and concepts in political and ecclesiastical thought from Antiquity until the Reformation

Daniel Ziemann 2.0
CC: The last reforms of medieval Christendom: Observances, Conciliarism, Heresies, Witch-hunts Gábor Klaniczay 2.0
CC: The last reforms of medieval Christendom: Observances, Conciliarism, Heresies, Witch-hunts Gábor Klaniczay 2.0
Classical Republicanism in Theory and Practice

The strand of political theory known as “Republicanism” has both great contemporary importance and deep classical roots, coming to us from the Roman res publica, and having its conceptual origins in Greek political thought. This course will focus on the classical idea of the Republic and its importance for later thinkers such as Machiavelli and Rousseau, considering not only the theoretical models with which ancient thinkers approached the Republic, but also the historical realities of the ancient Republic in practice.

Gina White 2.0
Classical Republicanism in Theory and Practice

The strand of political theory known as “Republicanism” has both great contemporary importance and deep classical roots, coming to us from the Roman res publica, and having its conceptual origins in Greek political thought. This course will focus on the classical idea of the Republic and its importance for later thinkers such as Machiavelli and Rousseau, considering not only the theoretical models with which ancient thinkers approached the Republic, but also the historical realities of the ancient Republic in practice.

Gina White 2.0
Conflict and Its Resolution Between Orality and the Written Word in Late-medieval Hungary

This seminar will explore issues such as the interplay between orality and the written word, conflict and the mechanisms used for its resolution, and the interaction between vernacular and Latin at the beginning of the sixteenth century. These topics will be addressed within the framework of a seminar where we will translate and comment on a document issued on 19 May 1503 recording in detail the testimonies of the parties involved in a violent conflict between a member of the local nobility and two citizens of Caransebeș/Karansebes.

 

Cristian-Nicolae Gaşpar 2.0
Conflict and Its Resolution Between Orality and the Written Word in Late-medieval Hungary

This seminar will explore issues such as the interplay between orality and the written word, conflict and the mechanisms used for its resolution, and the interaction between vernacular and Latin at the beginning of the sixteenth century. These topics will be addressed within the framework of a seminar where we will translate and comment on a document issued on 19 May 1503 recording in detail the testimonies of the parties involved in a violent conflict between a member of the local nobility and two citizens of Caransebeș/Karansebes.

 

Cristian-Nicolae Gaşpar 2.0
Countercultures and the Secret Services in Late Socialist Central Europe Gábor Klaniczay
Balázs Trencsényi
2.0
Countercultures and the Secret Services in Late Socialist Central Europe Gábor Klaniczay
Balázs Trencsényi
2.0
Curious Collections to Digital Repositories: Institutional History of Cultural Heritage Marcell Sebők
Documentary Heritage: Practices of Managing Information - Selecting, Storing, Summarizing

The course offers an overview of wide range of social practices on managing information, data and knowledge from Antiquity to present times, though not in a strict chronological order. Rather, it intends to concentrate on crossover issues with regard to historical records and proofs, heritage management, knowledge-production in our societies. By the same token it offers a critical appraisal of the uses of digital media by cultural heritage institutions, it keeps interrogating the relationship between material and digital object to map possibilities for "virtual cultural heritage".

Marcell Sebők
Gabriella Ivacs
Diane Geraci
2.0
Documentary Heritage: Practices of Managing Information - Selecting, Storing, Summarizing

The course offers an overview of wide range of social practices on managing information, data and knowledge from Antiquity to present times, though not in a strict chronological order. Rather, it intends to concentrate on crossover issues with regard to historical records and proofs, heritage management, knowledge-production in our societies. By the same token it offers a critical appraisal of the uses of digital media by cultural heritage institutions, it keeps interrogating the relationship between material and digital object to map possibilities for "virtual cultural heritage".

Marcell Sebők
Gabriella Ivacs
Diane Geraci
2.0
Early Modern Anthropologies: Observing, Describing, Professing Nature and Science Marcell Sebők 2.0
Faculty Research Seminar

The Faculty Research Seminar invites the departmental and CEU communities to share, learn about and discuss ongoing research. Presenters – visiting scholars, resident faculty, as well as advanced doctoral students or post-docs – are encouraged to offer work-in-progress (draft book chapters, articles, conference papers) or problematic passages from their sources for discussion, rather than to read refined papers. Topics will cover the whole range of medieval and historical studies at CEU.

Daniel Ziemann 1.0
Friendship in Late Antiquity and in the Middle Ages

Friendship, an intimate relationship predicated on mutual affection and commitment, was presented as the highest ethical goal and the most esteemed connection from the ancient world up to the Renaissance. A bond unlike those of kin or tribe in that it is not simply given with birth, friendship is an “achieved” rather than an “ascribed” relationship, with a potent moral and symbolic content.

Marianne Sághy 2.0
Friendship in Late Antiquity and in the Middle Ages

Friendship, an intimate relationship predicated on mutual affection and commitment, was presented as the highest ethical goal and the most esteemed connection from the ancient world up to the Renaissance. A bond unlike those of kin or tribe in that it is not simply given with birth, friendship is an “achieved” rather than an “ascribed” relationship, with a potent moral and symbolic content.

Marianne Sághy 2.0
Independent Study

For medieval students only; students read important works in their area of interest in consultation with their advisors. The amount of reading will vary with the number of credits students enroll for.  PhD students with expertise close to the MA student’s thesis topic can be involved in selecting and discussing the readings.

2.0
Introduction to Interdisciplinary Medieval Studies

The course aims to provide students with an overview of recent historiographical and methodological discussions around "Medieval Studies". The class will not follow a chronological path (and overview) but attempts to trace historiographical trends as well introduce a variety of disciplines (archaeology, numismatics, theology etc.) necessary to study and understand the "Middle Ages". However, the sessions on these disciplines will also have a thematic focus in order to demonstrate the interplay between various disciplines and their use for scholars and students in their research.

Volker Menze
József Laszlovszky
2.0
Introduction to Research Resources for Cultural Heritage Studies and the Cultural Heritage of Budapest

The course intends to introduce new students in cultural heritage studies to the research resources offered by CEU in general, with a view of other heritage institutions (museums, monument protection institutions, archives, libraries) in Budapest. It incorporates presentations and guided tours offered by faculty members and experts working in the different heritage related institutions.

József Laszlovszky
Balázs Nagy
2.0
Introduction to Research Resources for Medievalists

The course intends to introduce new medievalist students to the research resources offered by CEU in general and the Department of Medieval Studies in particular, with visits to libraries and museums in Budapest. It incorporates most of the presentations offered by faculty members in the previous years in the pre-session and the library visits organised in the same period. Besides these, it gives an overview of the research facilities and main academic journals available for the students of our department.

Balázs Nagy 2.0
Language as Part of Cultural Heritage

The present course aims to offer an introduction into the general topic of language as part of the intangible cultural heritage (IHC) as defined in official UNESCO documents such. The course will also address the more specific issue of language policy within the legal and institutional framework created by the UNESCO documents in view of the limitations it imposes on defining and protecting language not per se but as a vehicle of IHC.

Cristian-Nicolae Gaşpar 2.0
Language as Part of Cultural Heritage

The present course aims to offer an introduction into the general topic of language as part of the intangible cultural heritage (IHC) as defined in official UNESCO documents such. The course will also address the more specific issue of language policy within the legal and institutional framework created by the UNESCO documents in view of the limitations it imposes on defining and protecting language not per se but as a vehicle of IHC.

Cristian-Nicolae Gaşpar 2.0
Latin Palaeography, Book hand

The aim of the course is to provide tuition in the practical skill of Latin palaeography (book hand). The course focuses on the reading and transcription of various scripts with samples ranging from the 4th to the 15th centuries, covering the whole medieval period. Each class consists of sight reading (reading without preparation) of photocopied manuscript folios written in different scripts, discussion of the characteristics of the hand, script and abbreviations and a brief introduction to the relevant script through powerpoint presentation and white board illustration.

Anna Somfai 2.0
Medieval Codicology

The aim of the course is to provide familiarity with the medieval manuscript book, the object that transmitted classical and medieval texts and images and now enables us to arrive at a knowledge concerning the environment, interests and scholarship of those who produced and used each codex.

Anna Somfai 2.0
Medieval Mysticism (Reading Class in Latin)

The course offers close reading of influential mystical texts of the High Middle Ages (Bernard of Clairvaux, William of St. Thierry, and Bonaventure).

György Geréby 2.0
Medieval Mysticism (Reading Class in Latin)

The course offers close reading of influential mystical texts of the High Middle Ages (Bernard of Clairvaux, William of St. Thierry, and Bonaventure).

György Geréby 2.0
Medieval Political Theories: Late Antiquity, Byzantium and the Latin West

Introduction and overview of the guiding ideas and main issues and debates in Late Antique / Early Christian, Byzantine and Latin political ideas (and political theology).

György Geréby
Medieval Political Theories: Late Antiquity, Byzantium and the Latin West

Introduction and overview of the guiding ideas and main issues and debates in Late Antique / Early Christian, Byzantine and Latin political ideas (and political theology).

György Geréby
Medieval Theories of Language and Logic

Introduction to the main ideas of the sophisticated thought on language and logic in the schools of the High Middle Ages (“scholasticism”), including theories of sign (semantic theory), language, and basics of medieval logic.

György Geréby 2.0
Medieval Theories of Language and Logic

Introduction to the main ideas of the sophisticated thought on language and logic in the schools of the High Middle Ages (“scholasticism”), including theories of sign (semantic theory), language, and basics of medieval logic.

György Geréby 2.0
Reading Medieval Latin Poetry: From Translation to Interpretation

Taking as starting point a selection of representative fragments of medieval Latin poetry, this seminar will explore, with the means of modern critical theory, the various ways in which medieval poetic texts can be understood, enjoyed, interpreted, and (re)contextualized today.

Cristian-Nicolae Gaşpar 2.0
Reading Medieval Latin Poetry: From Translation to Interpretation

Taking as starting point a selection of representative fragments of medieval Latin poetry, this seminar will explore, with the means of modern critical theory, the various ways in which medieval poetic texts can be understood, enjoyed, interpreted, and (re)contextualized today.

Cristian-Nicolae Gaşpar 2.0
Scholastic Philosophy and Theology of Nature

High scholasticism (13th-14th c.) developed a sophisticated and original way to discuss issues in natural philosophy. These debates, however, were related both methodologically and institutionally to theological debates. Theology had exercised both a constraint and a liberating effect since it forced theologian-philosophers to devise alternatives to the Aristotelian paradigm. The course offers an introduction to the reception and reactions to classical natural philosophy. 

György Geréby 2.0

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